I'm a designer!
appstore-pictures-07.png

Clam Counter

Clam Counter is a nature conservation app allows users to submit their mussel sightings to the Toronto Zoo.

appstore-pictures-07.png

Service provided

User Interface design for Android and iOS / User Surveys/ Wireframes/Prototyping / Graphic assets

Role

Lead UI/UX Designer

  • End to end product delivery

  • create digital assets (icons and graphics) for a mussel conservation

  • mobile (Android and iOS) and web application,

  • perform user research through mock-ups and Surveys

  • conduct quality assurance testing for Launch

  • work with the project coordinator to ensure the app meet specifications and guidelines

Clients

zoo logo.png

Project Scope

Clam Counter allows users to report their mussel sightings to the Toronto Zoo and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. It can also be used offline as a convenient reference library of all freshwater mussel species in Canada.

Results

Live for Android and iOS, The app is now used in mussel identification workshops hosted the DFO to aid in the conservation and data collection of freshwater mussels in Ontario.  

As of 2018 December, Clam Counter has over 600 installs and around 155 active users on Android and iOS platforms. he app is available for free download now on Google Play and the App Store!


Animations

Animated badges are used to provide delight to the user as they move from one tier to the next

Tier 1: Egg

Tier 1: Egg

Tier 2: Larvae

Tier 2: Larvae

Tier 3: Juvenile

Tier 3: Juvenile

Tier 4: Adult

Tier 4: Adult

Illustrations

Illustrations are used in promotions and in app tutorials.

Walk-through 1

Walk-through 1

Walk-through 2

Walk-through 2

User observations after product launch 

Soon after the launch of Clam Counter, I had the opportunity to visit my users in their first mussel observation field trip. Everyone was required to wear a protective water proof suit to get down into the river. I was helping out with mostly holding the bucket full of mussels, as well as taking notes on how people are using the app.

Here is the river where the field trip was taking place. You scoop up the mussel with your hand, and use the app to identify which kind of mussel it is.

Here is the river where the field trip was taking place. You scoop up the mussel with your hand, and use the app to identify which kind of mussel it is.

We have collected a few samples to test and identify. The app was able to identify most of the mussels, except for a few that required an expert eye from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

We have collected a few samples to test and identify. The app was able to identify most of the mussels, except for a few that required an expert eye from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

Main insights from observation

The river water was almost waist deep, because of this, most users keep their phones either on the river banks or tucked away in their breast pocket.

It was difficult for them to use a cell phone in the middle of a streaming river, lest they risk the consequence of dropping their phone into the water.

One user pointed out that they prefer using a waterproof field guide for outdoor activities, but the app was very useful during the indoor workshop that happened last week.

The medium we had to work with came with many restrictions, and it will not completely replace a printed field guide. Given that, under optimal conditions such as an indoor workshop, the application allows a degree of flexibility and speed that are unmatched by a field guide book.